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Equilibrium Nutrition Needs to Focus on Nine Kinds of Food

Zoom in font  Zoom out font Published: 2019-02-25  Origin: cfsn.cn  Views: 13
Core Tip: There are many kinds of coarse grains, including millet, corn, sorghum, black rice, buckwheat, oats and other coarse grains, as well as whole wheat flour and brown rice,also including mung beans, red beans, kidney beans, lentils and other hybrid beans.
Coarse grains/whole grains. There are many kinds of coarse grains, including millet, corn, sorghum, black rice, buckwheat, oats and other coarse grains, as well as whole wheat flour and brown rice,also including mung beans, red beans, kidney beans, lentils and other hybrid beans. Sometimes potatoes can also be used as coarse grains.

Dark vegetables. Dark green, red and yellow and purple vegetables have higher nutritional value and more health benefits, accounting for 50% of all vegetables. Green leafy vegetables such as rape, cabbage, broccoli, garlic bolt, green pepper, balsam pear and other dark green vegetables, red and yellow vegetables such as tomatoes, carrots, purple cabbage and other purple vegetables, should become the leading role of table vegetables.

Fresh fruit. Dietary guidelines recommend that average adults eat 200 to 350 grams of fruit a day. Generally, the nutritional value of darker colors is higher, but as a whole, the nutritional value of various fruits has little difference and can be enjoyed according to local conditions.

Soybean products. Soybean milk, tofu, dried tofu and other soybean products have high nutritional value. They are not only important sources of high-quality protein, phospholipids, calcium, zinc, B vitamins, vitamin E and other nutrients, but also low-fat, cholesterol-free.

Eggs. The protein content of eggs is about 12%, which is one of the highest nutritional value and the best quality proteins in natural foods, surpassing that of animal foods such as meat. Eggs are also an important source of phospholipids and B vitamins, vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin E, and trace elements such as iron, zinc and selenium. Moreover, eggs are especially easy to digest and absorb. One egg per day is recommended.

Fish, shrimp and lean meat. Animal meat and poultry meat are good sources of high-quality protein, lipids and other nutrients, and are important components of a reasonable dietary structure. A total of about 100 to 150 grams of meat, fish and shrimp per day is enough.

Milk. Milk is a patent product specially used by mammals to feed the next generation. It has a complete range of nutrients, rich content, appropriate proportion, easy digestion and absorption, and high nutritional value. Especially because of its high calcium content and high absorption rate, it is difficult for other foods to completely replace it. Dietary guidelines recommend drinking 300 grams of milk a day.

Nut. Nuts such as peanuts, walnuts, pistachios, pine nuts, almonds, cashew nuts and hazelnuts have high nutritional value. They are important sources of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and trace elements.

Olive oil and linseed oil. From a health point of view, edible oil should first be reduced, light diet, as little as possible fried and over-oiled. Secondly, edible oils should be diversified and olive oil and linseed oil, which are generally lacking at present, should be increased. The former is the main source of monounsaturated fatty acid - oleic acid, which has been proved to be beneficial to cardiovascular; the latter is the main source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid - linolenic acid, which is beneficial to maintaining fatty acid balance.

"Eat everything, but don't eat too much" is a popular understanding of the diversity of diet, but if we really want to achieve a balanced diet, balanced nutrition, we have to grasp the key word "key foods". "Key foods" have two meanings: one is that they are of high nutritional value, and the other is that they are often lacking in people's diets.

 
 
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