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Current Position:Home » News » Agri & Animal Products » Fruits & Vegetables » Topic

Dragonfruit is one of the most seasonable exotics in the market

Zoom in font  Zoom out font Published: 2017-04-07  Views: 8
Core Tip: When it comes to exporting it around the world, pitahaya—fruit more commonly known in North America as dragonfruit—is currently seeing low supply.
When it comes to exporting it around the world, pitahaya—fruit more commonly known in North America as dragonfruit—is currently seeing low supply. “This fruit is one of the most seasonable exotics you can find in the market. So supply right now is low,” says Santiago Mosquera of Las Vegas, NV-based Terra Exports. “We have around 500 kg. per week in the first part of the month, with the aim to increase them by three times as much in the second part of April.” Terra then hopes to have a steady offer of the mild-tasting fruit until the end of May when the season comes to an end.

Imports from Colombia and Ecuador

The imports are hailing from two countries in South America—Colombia and Ecuador, with the majority coming from the former in the regions of Valle del Cauca and Huila. In Ecuador, production is more concentrated in the Palora region.

“But in Colombia, most of our competitions come from the Andean region where the big exporters are located,” says Mosquera. “Some of them also have some plantations in the south where we are located, but to keep control in their areas they rather keep the farms in center of the country. The biggest competition comes from Ecuador itself where most of the exporters are concentrated in Palora, the region supplying most of the export quality Pitahaya to Asia.” Asia—particularly cities such as Hong Kong, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur—are key markets for Terra Exports. “At the same time with the support of our different offices we are trying to introduce the fruit in markets like London and Dubai,” says Mosquera.

Fluctuating factor
Given the fluctuating climate in South America, pricing tends to fluctuate equally so. “For instance, as the volumes from one week to another can abruptly decrease, the prices can be affected by 50 percent or more,” says Mosquera. In fact, the tropical weather is so unpredictable that production sometimes can’t be planned more than four weeks ahead.

Given that fluctuation, Terra plans for the coming years to invest more in the region. “We want to create a constant supply for more departments inside the country,” says Mosquera. “Pitahaya has a great potential and we are looking forward to extend it across the world.”

 
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